How to Procedurally Change Cell Color

Want to procedurally change a single cell color. Cannot find any help for it.
What help term should I be searching upon?

If you are talking about cells in the data sheet: You can’t change the cell background color or text color at all.

If you want to mark cells in the data sheet with coloured elements, you can use emoji symbols.

If you are talking about form objects: You can procedurally set all kind of properties of form objects.

I’m talking about cells displayed in a form.
In Pan 6 I did a lot of it using code such as <StyleColor “cell blue”>
I no longer can find any help for it.

Name your Text Editor Object used for the cell (I named it “mycell” in the example below) and then use this statement to change the text color as needed procedurally:

changeobject "mycell","color",htmlrgb("0000FF")

The Text Editor Object’s text should now be blue.

You set the object’s name by selecting it in graphics mode and then use the Measurements pane of the Properties Panel to enter the name.

image

Thanks Gary. Looks like this should do the job.
I was drawing a complete blank trying to transition from the Pan 6 to command to doing it in Pan X.

I don’t think Gary’s solution is what you are looking for. What Gary is suggesting will change the color for of the cell for every record. I think Jack want to the cell to be different colors for different records.

Panorama X does not have the ability to apply styles and colors to individual cells, fields or records. This was discussed in detail on the forum a few years ago.

For what it’s worth, a user can change the size of the font in the Finder.

That’s an old post. Panorama has had the ability to change the font size in the data sheet for several years now. But the discussion about styles and colors is still relevant.

LOL, you actually made that exact same point on that old thread.

And for this and all similar situations, this is the go-to site for colour specifications:

https://www.rapidtables.com/web/color/RGB_Color.html#color-table

Jim’s assumption is correct. (It worked great in Pan 6,)