Using Email to Receive and Reply to Discourse Topics


#1

If you want to receive an email every time someone posts or replies to a topic, you need to check a few preference boxes. Begin by clicking your avatar, and choosing the little gear wheel that appears in the menu.

That will open your preferences. Then you click on “Emails” in the left column and check boxes you think are appropriate.

You can reply to a post by sending an email reply. To start a new topic, you need to do that from the forum.


#2

Note that there is some latency between when a post is made to the forum and when an email notice is received. From the timing I have noted it is almost exactly 10 minutes from the time the post is entered to the time I receive the email notice.


#3

I think that’s to give the author of the post a little bit of time to edit, before the typos go out in an email.

Dave


#4

I imagine you are correct but I do question the necessity of that since this forum has a very nice preview pane that lets you go over your post before entering. This is very helpful especially if you are taking advantage of the markdown features. Bitbucket also has a nice preview feature but you have to manually trigger it if you want to check things out before posting. I wish Slack had a preview feature as well (unless I’ve missed it some how.)


#5

Gary, read about greylisting, http://www.greylisting.org. This could be the cause of your 10 minute delay. I had this issue a couple of months ago, and for some reason greylisting was enabled by default in my e-mail server. Worth taking a look.

Hugo


#6

Thanks for the suggestion Hugo. I checked this out and it doesn’t look like my email provider (GoDaddy) supports greylisting at all and there is no option to turn it off. If I am relatively unique in experiencing this delay then I don’t know what the hangup might be. I never had a delay with the qna list and received anything I posted emailed back within a minute or two.


#7

No, I’m pretty sure David has the correct answer – Discourse is delaying 10 minutes to give the original author time to make edits. I actually read this somewhere when I was learning about Discourse, most likely, David saw it also.